More Rosslyn Chapel

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I had so many lovely shots from Rosslyn Chapel that I felt the need to do another post about it.

ON THE GROUND

I like this shot because it clearly shows the three different colours of sandstone – grey, pink and yellow – that Rosslyn Chapel is made from. This piebald effect occurred because the stone used to build the church came from three different local quarries.

Rosslyn Chapel
Kirsty Hall: Rosslyn Chapel, July 2008

One of Rosslyn’s famous ‘Green Man’ carvings nestling in the archway above some eroded greenery. The Green Man is a traditional symbol thought to represent fertility, so it’s a bit of a mystery why so many of them ended up being carved into medieval Christian churches – Rosslyn has more than a hundred of them.

Rosslyn Chapel
Kirsty Hall: Rosslyn Chapel, July 2008

It’s impossible to tell if this carving was originally a monkey or a human figure that has slipped down the evolutionary tree in the rain!

Rosslyn Chapel
Kirsty Hall: Rosslyn Chapel, July 2008

FROM THE ROOF

As far as I could tell, each spire on the roof was slightly different. Imagine the artistic passion involved in designing so many different spires even though they’d hardly ever be seen up close.

Of course, at the moment visitors can climb up and see them but the original builders wouldn’t have expected that. I found myself wondering if the spires were carved by one very driven man or by a group who were competing to see who could come up with the most unusual design?

Rosslyn Chapel
Kirsty Hall: Rosslyn Chapel, July 2008

Sadly the rain has eroded the soft sandstone on the outside of the chapel but much of the original detail can still be seen.

Rosslyn Chapel
Kirsty Hall: Rosslyn Chapel, July 2008

Rosslyn Chapel
Kirsty Hall: Rosslyn Chapel, July 2008

Despite the signs asking them not to, people still seemed compelled to throw money into the gargoyles.

Rosslyn Chapel
Kirsty Hall: Rosslyn Chapel, July 2008

Looking down from the chapel roof onto the ruined Roslin castle. This area had been visited by artists and writers since the 1700’s and it was particularly popular with Romantic artists (even Turner painted here); looking at this misty shot, it’s easy to see why.

Rosslyn Chapel
Kirsty Hall: Rosslyn Chapel, July 2008

If it had been earlier in the day and a bit drier, I would have taken a walk through the beautiful and historic Roslin Glen. Perhaps next time…

I am an artist & purveyor of obsessive projects based in Hebden Bridge, England. My work involves the accretion of large numbers of small objects - pins in fabric, knots in string or hundreds of envelopes - to make sculptures that deal with fragility, loss, repetition, obsession and time.

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