3 Score & 10

Hooray, I've finally finished the second report from last month's Front Room art trail. It would have been done sooner but I've been down with The Never-Ending Virus Of Doom.

3 Score & 10
Kirsty Hall: 3 Score & 10, 2005, as shown at Front Room, Nov 2009

As well as doing the Red Thread performance piece, I decided to listen to the voices of reason (aka Dave Devereux and Cat Vincent) and NOT make another sculptural piece at such short notice. Instead, I installed 3 Score & 10, an existing sculpture which was completed in 2005 but which had only been shown twice before.

It was a wise choice. Not only was it a lot less stress but it looked stunning in the space. It was also hugely popular with visitors - sitting at the top of the stairs, I would often hear people exclaiming in wonder as they came up the staircase.

3 Score & 10
Kirsty Hall: 3 Score & 10, 2005, as shown at Front Room, Nov 2009

3 Score & 10 is part of an ongoing series of work exploring the meaning and measurement of time. It comprises 70 long pieces of string, each containing 365 hand-tied knots. The knots represent the number of days (including leap days) that you would experience if you lived to your biblically allotted 70 years. It contains 25,568 knots and took just under two years to complete.

3 Score & 10
Kirsty Hall: 3 Score & 10, 2005, as shown at Front Room, Nov 2009

This piece is different every time it's installed. The first time, it fell neatly to the floor. The second time, it was shown in a tangle. And this third time, people were able to actually walk through the piece, which was very successful as it gave them a different visual experience from every angle.

3 Score & 10
Kirsty Hall: 3 Score & 10, 2005, as shown at Front Room, Nov 2009

I was fortunate enough to have many intense conversations with visitors about the meaning of time. One thing I noticed was that the majority were fascinated by how long the piece had taken to make and the fact that I'd done all the knotting myself. It confirmed my recent realisation that there is an intangible value in making these sort of pieces myself, even though it's undoubtedly slow and inefficient.

3 Score & 10
Kirsty Hall: 3 Score & 10, 2005, as shown at Front Room, Nov 2009

One conversation that really moved me was with a model ship builder who was initially rather sceptical about my work until he suddenly connected it with the intricacy, repetition and length of time it took him to make his models, at which point he completely switched around and 'got' what I was doing. It's these sort of moments that make showing art so worthwhile for me. I just love the generous way people open up to me and share their thoughts and ideas about what my work is about - it's a huge privilege.

3 Score & 10
Kirsty Hall: 3 Score & 10, 2005, as shown at Front Room, Nov 2009

11 thoughts on “3 Score & 10

  1. I love that you make your pieces yourself. Of course you could employ a team of people to do the knotting for you and have it finished in a month but I really think there's value and meaning in the process of making the art yourself. I probably can't express what I feel about this properly but I'll try! Its like in making it you invest yourself in the piece and give a little of yourself with each knot. Which is especially valuable when your piece is about age & ageing. I've always felt uneasy about art "factories" á la Damien Hirst's method of production. It makes it so much more difficult for me to connect with a piece on a personal & human level. I guess that is more important for your work than for Damiens & its has a huge amount to do with my personal preferences for "personal" art. But I think what I'm trying to say is the process of making art is as important as the concept & sometimes these days people loose sight of that or dismiss it. And I love that you make your own art. The time & effort & intricacies of your work are wonderful.

    [Reply]

    Reply:

    Interesting thoughts, missmilki, thank you. In all honesty, a lot of my practice is also dictatated by economics. Because I don't sell, I don't really have the option to employ people to make my art but I don't think I'd be comfortable with the idea even if I could. At heart, I'm a maker and I get unhappy when I'm not making my work.

    [Reply]

    Reply:

    Interesting thoughts, missmilki, thank you. In all honesty, a lot of my practice is also dictatated by economics. Because I don't sell, I don't really have the option to employ people to make my art but I don't think I'd be comfortable with the idea even if I could. At heart, I'm a maker and I get unhappy when I'm not making my work.

    [Reply]

    Reply
  2. I love that you make your pieces yourself. Of course you could employ a team of people to do the knotting for you and have it finished in a month but I really think there's value and meaning in the process of making the art yourself. I probably can't express what I feel about this properly but I'll try! Its like in making it you invest yourself in the piece and give a little of yourself with each knot. Which is especially valuable when your piece is about age & ageing. I've always felt uneasy about art "factories" á la Damien Hirst's method of production. It makes it so much more difficult for me to connect with a piece on a personal & human level. I guess that is more important for your work than for Damiens & its has a huge amount to do with my personal preferences for "personal" art. But I think what I'm trying to say is the process of making art is as important as the concept & sometimes these days people loose sight of that or dismiss it. And I love that you make your own art. The time & effort & intricacies of your work are wonderful.

    [Reply]

    Reply
  3. I love that you make your pieces yourself. Of course you could employ a team of people to do the knotting for you and have it finished in a month but I really think there's value and meaning in the process of making the art yourself. I probably can't express what I feel about this properly but I'll try! Its like in making it you invest yourself in the piece and give a little of yourself with each knot. Which is especially valuable when your piece is about age & ageing. I've always felt uneasy about art "factories" á la Damien Hirst's method of production. It makes it so much more difficult for me to connect with a piece on a personal & human level. I guess that is more important for your work than for Damiens & its has a huge amount to do with my personal preferences for "personal" art. But I think what I'm trying to say is the process of making art is as important as the concept & sometimes these days people loose sight of that or dismiss it. And I love that you make your own art. The time & effort & intricacies of your work are wonderful.

    [Reply]

    Reply:

    Interesting thoughts, missmilki, thank you. In all honesty, a lot of my practice is also dictatated by economics. Because I don't sell, I don't really have the option to employ people to make my art but I don't think I'd be comfortable with the idea even if I could. At heart, I'm a maker and I get unhappy when I'm not making my work.

    [Reply]

    Reply
  4. This post really caught my attention :o) I agree with MissMilki, investing so much time in your art shows a real dedication that, nowadays, doesn't exist so much.

    The piece itself is simply beautiful! It reminds me of a spiders web & how it shares a real delicacy with life. I like the idea of strands too, instead of one continuous string.. it seems to suit the motion of time and the way it passes :o)

    Thankyou for sharing this!

    [Reply]

    Reply:

    Thank you Chloe, I'm glad you like it. I actually think there's a resurgence of the concept of handcrafting at the moment, both in fine art and more generally with the current rise of the DIY culture movement as exemplified in the documentary, Handmade Nation.

    [Reply]

    Reply
  5. This post really caught my attention :o) I agree with MissMilki, investing so much time in your art shows a real dedication that, nowadays, doesn't exist so much.

    The piece itself is simply beautiful! It reminds me of a spiders web & how it shares a real delicacy with life. I like the idea of strands too, instead of one continuous string.. it seems to suit the motion of time and the way it passes :o)

    Thankyou for sharing this!

    [Reply]

    Reply
  6. This post really caught my attention :o) I agree with MissMilki, investing so much time in your art shows a real dedication that, nowadays, doesn't exist so much.

    The piece itself is simply beautiful! It reminds me of a spiders web & how it shares a real delicacy with life. I like the idea of strands too, instead of one continuous string.. it seems to suit the motion of time and the way it passes :o)

    Thankyou for sharing this!

    [Reply]

    Reply:

    Thank you Chloe, I'm glad you like it. I actually think there's a resurgence of the concept of handcrafting at the moment, both in fine art and more generally with the current rise of the DIY culture movement as exemplified in the documentary, Handmade Nation.

    [Reply]

    Reply

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